I took this photograph just after sunset on a crisp February on the shores of Lough Corrib near Cong, Co. Mayo. 
It was taken from a viewpoint that was once part of the estate of the nearby Ashford Castle which in the late 1800’s was owned by Sir Arthur Guinness (great grandson of the famous Arthur Guinness of St James Gate brewry).  
In 1880 Arthur received the tittle of Barron Ardilaun and upon his death in his wife Lady Ardilaun erected an obelisk to his memory.  The limestone  obelisk is about 15' high and stands facing the island from which the baron took his title.   It was built next to a chalet where the Barron and Lady Ardilaun liked to walk to along the lake shore from Ashford Castle to have tea while enjoying the views of the Corrib. 
The obelisk bears the inscription ‘Rien ne m’est plus; Plus ne m’est rien’ which means ‘Nothing remains to me any longer, anything that remains means nothing’.
Lough Corrib is the second largest lake in Ireland and it is said to be home to 365 islands; one for every day of the year.   It stretches nearly forty miles from Cong and the Maam valley in Connemara to Galway city in the South where it flows into the Corrib River and on into the Atlantic ocean. 
I took this photograph just after sunset on a crisp February on the shores of Lough Corrib near Cong, Co. Mayo. It was taken from a viewpoint that was once part of the estate of the nearby Ashford Castle which in the late 1800’s was owned by Sir Arthur Guinness (great grandson of the famous Arthur Guinness of St James Gate brewry).  

In 1880 Arthur received the tittle of Barron Ardilaun and upon his death in his wife Lady Ardilaun erected an obelisk to his memory.  The limestone  obelisk is about 15' high and stands facing the island from which the baron took his title.  It was built next to a chalet where the Barron and Lady Ardilaun liked to walk to along the lake shore from Ashford Castle to have tea while enjoying the views of the Corrib. 

The obelisk bares the inscription ‘Rien ne m’est plus; Plus ne m’est rien’ which means ‘Nothing remains to me any longer, anything that remains means nothing’.

Lough Corrib is the second largest lake in Ireland and it is said to be home to 365 islands; one for every day of the year.   It stretches nearly forty miles from Cong and the Maam valley in Connemara to Galway city in the South where it flows into the Corrib River and on into the Atlantic ocean. 
 

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© Ciaran McHugh Photography 2009-2017, by Sea Design